The Seiko Bullhead

The Seiko Bullhead

The Seiko Bullhead is one of those watches that really divides people. Some love its distinct pusher configuration and others not so much. These unusual looks extend to the dial as well with a vertical date and day window at the six o’clock rather than a horizontal at the three o’clock. These deviations from tradition has turned it into a fan favourite and created a cult following for the watch. An unpolished and all original model is highly sought after amongst collectors and only getting rarer and more valuable.

 

Before the Bullhead became this cult figure in the watch world it was designed for a purpose. Despite what you might think the designers didn’t make it look distinct for strictly aesthetic reasons but for also a practical reason. Seiko noticed customers would occasionally engage or disengage the chronograph by mistake and wanted to make it harder to do so. They rotated the movement and put the pushers at the top of the case as it made you less likely to accidentally press any of the pushers. The result was the Bullhead, named such because it looks like the horns of a bull.

 

Whilst that was the reason for the change unquestionably the appearance is what makes it such a desirable watch. There isn’t anything quite like a bullhead from Seiko or Citizen. They sit proudly on the wrist and are very eye catching. Particularly when in a unique colour like the chocolate Seiko or yellow citizen. The Citizen having seen a resurgence thanks to the Tarantino film “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”. The Seiko though will always have the crown when it comes to Bullhead watches.

 

There’s a charm to the chunky Seiko especially when mixed with the brown dial that makes it both fun and practical. There are some tips for when you are picking up a Seiko Bullhead, or any vintage watch really. The most important one is remember that you are buying the movement above all else, it is easier to fix appearance issues than mechanical ones. Secondly make sure the watch hasn’t been aggressively polished, a tidy up is good but too much and you might find yourself with a watch that has ruined lines. Third go for items with as many original pieces as possible, even if you decide to swap things out it is important to hang onto the original parts. Finally, watches with some patina or aging is far nicer than overly clinical looking watches that lived in a safe its entire life. You are buying a vintage watch and part of the charm is it looking vintage.

 

We currently have in a Seiko Bullhead from 1975 and if you are interested please follow the link below or get in touch with us.

 

https://theclassicwatchbuyersclub.com/products/seiko-bullhead

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1 comment

The Seiko Bullhead is fantastic is it in full working order? Have you serviced it ? The Crystal is very badly scratched, I’ve seen a few on eBay for £400-600 how munch are you charging?

Daniel Hacker

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