Watch Anatomy - Crown, Pushers, Bezel, Helium Escape Valve...

Watch Anatomy - Crown, Pushers, Bezel, Helium Escape Valve...

Watches come in many different shapes and form but there are certain consistencies across designs. Today we are going to break down the main points and what each part means. We will be using a dive watch and a chronograph, both from Omega as examples. I will avoid listing the more obvious parts, hands, dial and so on, focus instead on the more niche parts of the watch.

 

 

 

Helium Escape Valve – This becomes a science class very quick but to simplify it helium builds up inside the watch during a deep dive due to how small helium particles are. Having helium inside your watch while below water is fine as the internal and external pressure are level. However, as you start to ascend and the external pressure drops and the internal pressure has to go somewhere to make the pressure inside and outside equal. This leads to the helium escaping the watch by blowing the crystal off of the watch. To avoid this some watches come with a valve, normally on the opposite side of the watch to the crown, which when unscrewed will release the helium. Basically, as you ascend you unscrew the crown releasing the pressure and protecting your watch. More modern minded watches come with an automatic helium escape valve.

Dive Time Bezel – As it sounds it is a bezel which you can use to time things. Simply rotate the bezel so the pip lines up with the minute hand and you now have a 60 minute tracker. We have written up a full article about bezels on watches and it can be found here, https://theclassicwatchbuyersclub.com/blogs/blog-updates/how-to-use-a-watch-bezel.

Lume Pip – Very simple part of the watch, it’s a little bit of lume at the 12 o’clock of the bezel so you can keep a track of the bezel even in low light conditions. Lume is basically glow in the dark paint.

Crown – Whilst most people know what a crown does I wanted to make special mention of the screw down crown. Most dive watches will come with a screwdown crown which as the name suggests requires you to manually screw and unscrew to change the time or date.

Bracelet/Strap – Pretty self-explanatory, it’s what keeps the watch attached to your wrist and as a general rule metallic bands are bracelets and leather or fabric bands are straps.

 

 

 

The watch pictured is a chronograph and for a more in depth guide of how to use a chronograph please follow our guide here, https://theclassicwatchbuyersclub.com/blogs/blog-updates/how-to-use-a-chronograph

 

Running Seconds – This sub dial tracks the seconds and will keep running regardless of the chronograph.

Tachymetre – A timing tool to work out your speed.

Top Pusher – When pressed the chronographs main seconds hand will start going and the minute and hour sub dials will start ticking. When pressed again it will pause the chronograph.

Bottom Pusher – When the chronograph is paused you pressed the bottom pusher to reset the chronograph. 

Chronograph Main Seconds Hand – Will start ticking when the top pusher is pressed and will track seconds.

Minute Sub Dial – Will start ticking when the top pusher is pressed and start tracking minutes, one rotation of the sub dial equates to thirty minutes.

Hour Sub Dial – Will start ticking when the top pusher is pressed and start tracking hours, one rotation of the sub dial equates to twelve hours.

  

If you have any questions please email us at sales@theclassicwatchbuyeyrsclub.com or leave a comment.

Back to blog

Leave a comment

Please note, comments need to be approved before they are published.